Grant allows UA students to tackle disparities in CPR training

Grant allows UA students to tackle disparities in CPR training
Doctors say Hispanics are less likely to receive bystander CPR than non-Hispanics. (Source: UA College of Medicine)

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - Medical students at the University of Arizona are using a new grant to provide life-saving tools to the Spanish speaking community in Tucson.

Research shows Hispanics are less likely to receive bystander CPR than non-Hispanics.

Doctors say the exercise can significantly increase someone’s chance of survival if they go into cardiac arrest, a leading cause of death in the U.S.

Through the $5,000 grant provided by the Arizona Area Health Education, students at the college of medicine created a video series in Spanish.

Students demonstrated how to perform CPR along with how to use defibrillator while a professor explained step-by-step in Spanish.

Marty Cisneroz, the student leading the project, said having these resources in communities like Tucson are crucial as the Hispanic population continues to grow.

He and fellow students will use the video series as a learning tool. This semester they will recruit Spanish-speaking people and test them before and after taking the test to see how well it worked.

Cisneroz worked alongside U of A professor Dr. Dan Deskind. He said everyone in our community --regardless of ethnicity -- should know how to perform CPR as it could save lives.

“We have a large Spanish speaking population within Tucson. So we need to have it available because it’s the most important provision in saving someone’s life,” he said.

He believes part of the disparity is that resources like this aren’t available to the community.

Beskind and Cisneroz hope the online resources spread beyond Tucson and into other cities with large Spanish-speaking communities.

The grant will also allow the university to purchase more mannequins that will be used during training exercises offered across Tucson.

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