U.S. Marshals capture fugitive wanted in 2001 Tucson murder - Tucson News Now

U.S. Marshals capture fugitive wanted in 2001 Tucson murder

(Max Montijo-LaMadrid) (Max Montijo-LaMadrid)
Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace) Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace)
Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace) Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace)
Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace) Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace)
Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace) Victim: Tanee Natividad (Source: Myspace)

By Christina Stymfal - email

TUCSON, AZ (KOLD) - A Mexican citizen wanted by the U.S. Marshals and the Tucson Police Department for First Degree Murder was apprehended on October 19, according to a news release.

Max Montijo-LaMadrid, 34, was taken into custody by the Sonora State Investigative Police, in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Montijo-LaMadrid will be transported to Mexico City by the Mexico Federal Investigative Agency to await extradition to Pima County, pursuant to a provisional arrest warrant, the U.S. Marshals stated.

A first degree murder warrant was issued for Max Montijo-La Madrid for the murder of Tanee Natividad, a 16-year-old Palo Verde High School student.

On November 18, 2001, Tanee Natividad and a friend were at a Jack-in-the-Box restaurant near Speedway and Swan. Montijo-LaMadrid was also at the fast food restaurant looking for revenge for an acquaintance that early was shot and killed by an unknown assailant. Montijo-LaMadrid mistakenly thought that the person he was looking for was in the car that Natividad was riding in. Montijo-LaMadrid indiscriminately opened fire on the car shooting Natividad in the head, the news release stated.

Over the past 10 years U.S. Marshals, Tucson Police Department, and 88-Crime, has pursued Montijo-LaMadrid. Last week, Deputy U.S. Marshals traveled to Hermosillo, Sonora Mexico to coordinate the investigation, capture and extradition with the Sonora State Investigative Police.

This collaboration resulted in the apprehension of Montijo-LaMadrid and ended his ten year run from the law. He was able to avoid capture for ten years by assuming another identity and moving frequently within the Republic of Mexico.

David P. Gonzales, U.S. Marshal for the District of Arizona, stated that "the arrest of Montijo-LaMadrid was the direct result of the close working relationships developed with Mexican law enforcement officials and the U.S. Marshal Service."

Click here to view this story on the Americas Most Wanted website.

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