Crew from Northwest Fire sent east for Sandy cleanup - Tucson News Now

Crew from Northwest Fire sent east for Sandy cleanup

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Three wildland firefighters handy with chainsaws and knowledgeable of collapse zones are now on the east coast preparing for two weeks of clearing debris in Sandy's wake.

We've seen the long lines of people waiting for supplies and heard about the massive losses of power.

Northwest Fire's three wildland firefighters will head up a 20 person team that will saw and clear brush and debris to allow for the repair and reinstallation of power lines.

The crew of three left yesterday.

They're trained on the use of chainsaws, but they're also prepared to be used in anyway they're needed.

They also know while they're in New Jersey now that they could end up anywhere they're needed.

And Mother Nature could give them more to handle with the nor'easter.

"They fight fire obviously in our environment into the 100's but there has been many times they've been snowed on in fires so certainly the nor'easter, there may be more precipitation than we're used to dealing with on a regular basis but it's certainly nothing that's out of their wheelhouse.  They equip themselves very well for their environment and they've made adjustments and they've made contacts prior to being dispatched out there," said Northwest Fire District Battalion Chief Stu Rodeffer.  

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