Fed by Threads helping out local and national food banks - Tucson News Now

Fed by Threads helping out local and national food banks

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TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

The Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona goes through 31,000 food boxes a month. That number rises during the holiday season. One local company has a way the public can help out and perhaps do some Christmas shopping at the same time.

Fed By Threads started as a seed that has been watered for years and is finally growing. Co-Founder Jade Beal grew up splitting her childhood between Mexico and Tucson. 

Beal had a vantage point that most kids don't. Part of the year she lived with no electricity, in a hut where the day was spent working to feed yourself. In Tucson she was overwhelmed by what she considered an abundance of food. With fast food on every corner she had a hard time understanding how someone could go hungry. The staggering fact that nearly 20 percent of parents in Arizona struggle to feed their kids had Beal and her partner Alok Appaduari concerned.

"Jade and I just said we have to do something," said Appaduari. So they put together a small clothing line. For each piece sold, one dollar goes to the Community Food Bank of Southern Arizona and one goes to the national organization Feeding America. While that may not seem like a lot, it provides ten meals. So far they have provided over 8,000 meals with their Fed By Threads Program.

"It says they recognize that food is a pretty basic item in life and all the other non-profits in town are great, but we feed people," said Jack Parris, with the Community Food Bank.

Humanitarians at heart, their newest line is all made in the United States and down to the label sustainable. "We've gone even further now we use wood pulp, this shirt is plastic bottles and organic cotton made in the USA." Even the way they ship is 100 percent bio degradable

"You feel good that you bought something that is helping your community people. You don't see them but, you know they need help so not only does it feel good, but it feels good," said Beal. Not leaving a carbon footprint instead an imprint on their community and the hungry children that need their help.

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