Prescription drug program delayed - Tucson News Now

Prescription drug program delayed

A program to set up prescription drug boxes at Tucson police substations has hit a snag.

The Drug Enforcement Agency has not given its blessing yet.

"I'm not sure why the DEA is taking as long as it is," says Roy Hullgren, Chair of the Drug Addiction, Prevention and Treatment Commission. "But we have to follow proper protocol."

When the approval comes, the commission will install boxes at several Tucson police sub-stations which will be open 24/7.

People who want to dispose of old, unused or unwanted prescription drugs will be able to drop the off in a secure drop box in a secure are of the substation.

Right now, many people flush them down the sink or toilet.

"That causes water contamination," says Hullgren.

It's not a recommended way of disposal.

Other times, they will drop them off at a scheduled event around the valley. Towns, police agencies and other organizations will sometimes hold a weekend event for drop offs.

But that's hit or miss.

Once the public becomes aware they can drop them off at a police substation, they will likely use them, especially if they feel it's secure.

But first, the DEA must give its permission for the program to move forward.

"The DEA is the enforcement over the collection of prescription drugs," Hullgren says. "So they are the ones responsible for the safety of the collections."

The commission must also find a way to pay for the boxes which can run several hundred dollars apiece.

As of now, there are some verbal commitments for help, but without the DEA permission, there's a little sweat.

"We have several groups that indicate they are interested in the funding of those boxes and we're hoping they will follow through once we get the permission from the DEA," he says.

 

  • Local newsMore>>

  • Tucson city council passes "upgrades" on 3 ordinances

    Tucson city council passes "upgrades" on 3 ordinances

    Wednesday, March 22 2017 10:04 PM EDT2017-03-23 02:04:02 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    In one council session, the Tucson City Council passed and updated three ordinances making all tougher and more stringent. 

    In one council session, the Tucson City Council passed and updated three ordinances making all tougher and more stringent. 

  • The first criminal case from testing old rape kits in Tucson

    The first criminal case from testing old rape kits in Tucson

    Wednesday, March 22 2017 9:52 PM EDT2017-03-23 01:52:48 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    More than a million dollars in grant money paid for the office to partner with the Tucson Police Department to process approximately 1,200 rape kits. Pima County Attorney Barbara LaWall said close to 400 kits have been tested so far, with 61 of those connecting to someone in a national database.

    More than a million dollars in grant money paid for the office to partner with the Tucson Police Department to process approximately 1,200 rape kits. Pima County Attorney Barbara LaWall said close to 400 kits have been tested so far, with 61 of those connecting to someone in a national database.

  • UA researchers working to stay a step ahead of medical device hackers

    UA researchers working to stay a step ahead of medical device hackers

    Wednesday, March 22 2017 9:50 PM EDT2017-03-23 01:50:23 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    University of Arizona researchers are looking for ways to stop a much different sort of hacking than the attacks on companies such as Target and Yahoo. It's hacking that could put your life at risk if you have an implanted medical device.

    University of Arizona researchers are looking for ways to stop a much different sort of hacking than the attacks on companies such as Target and Yahoo. It's hacking that could put your life at risk if you have an implanted medical device.

Powered by Frankly