Deadly November '12 CPD Shooting: Why some say it was race relat - Tucson News Now

Deadly November '12 CPD Shooting: Why some say it was race related?

Deadly November 2012 Police Shooting Deadly November 2012 Police Shooting

They call themselves The Task Force for Community Mobilization and they are not satisfied with Attorney General Mike DeWine's investigation and they're not afraid to say this was race related.

The task force met Thursday night and they want the U.S. Department of Justice to step in, calling this a civil rights issue.

"This is the 800 pound gorilla in the room. How come no Black officers were involved in the shooting? This is a city that 65%-75% Black and Hispanic, how come no black officers fired a shot," asked the group's leader Khalid Samad.  

"Those police officers, they neglected the training that they were put through because they had one idea on their mind, that's to kill two black people," added Rudolf Muhammad.

This group says officers are hiding behind their statement of -- "I feared for my life" -- namely from Officer Michael Brelo who not only reloaded three times during the barrage of bullets but also jumped on the hood of his squad car and that of the suspects.

"He clearly was not in fear of his life. That was an aggressive and assertive move and if you're in fear for your life you don't make an assertive move like that," said Samad.

They also want Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Tim McGinty to recues himself, saying he favors the police.

"Let us not forget that the crime was murder," said Griot Y-Von from the Audacity of Hope group. "Against two humans. So insert humanity into this whole issue."

Even though DeWine has clearly blamed the system and police brass, Samad places no blame on the Mayor or Police Chief.

"In the sense of that pursuit I wouldn't say that either one of them are responsible."

Copyright 2013 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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