Giant Louisiana sinkhole swallows 25 more trees - Tucson News Now

Giant Louisiana sinkhole swallows 25 more trees

Flyover picture of sinkhole on 3-21-13 (Source: Assumption Parish OEP) Flyover picture of sinkhole on 3-21-13 (Source: Assumption Parish OEP)
BAYOU CORNE, LA (WAFB) -

According to the Assumption Parish Police Jury website, the giant Louisiana sinkhole in Assumption Parish swallowed 25 more trees Monday night.

The slough-in happened along the southeastern side of the sinkhole. Also, a new crack, running parallel to the sinkhole edge, was observed on the Oxy 3 well pad access ramp to the sinkhole.

The website states: "Experts with Conservation and CB&I believe the slough-in event is linked to the period of elevated subsurface fluid and gas movement detected late last week in the area around the sinkhole and Oxy 3, as has been observed in previous similar events. At this time, the Oxy3/sinkhole monitoring alert status remains at Code 1, allowing work around the sinkhole to continue, as the slough-in appears to be related to the earlier subsurface activity – however, monitoring is constantly ongoing in the area and Conservation will advise the public of significant changes in subsurface conditions."

On March 13, Texas-Brine, a Houston based company which owns the salt dome that caused the sinkhole, announced they would begin assessing the homes and offering buyouts and settlements for the 350 people evacuated.

Bubbles were spotted in Bayou Corne and Grand Bayou in June 2012. Two months later, the ground opened up and left a nine acre sinkhole. Residents were evacuated and have been for the past seven months. Most affected residents began receiving weekly checks from Texas-Brine in the amount of $875 per week. The sinkhole is now about 12 acres in size.

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