CDC: Valley fever in AZ up substantially - Tucson News Now

UPDATE

CDC: Valley fever in AZ up substantially

Posted: Updated:
CBS 5 CBS 5
  • HealthMore>>

  • FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    FDA to propose e-cigarette regulations

    © FDA© FDA
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is proposing long-awaited regulations governing the fast-growing electronic cigarette industry.
  • People seek out health info when famous person dies

    People seek out health info when famous person dies

    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
    WEDNESDAY, April 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests. Researchers surveyed 1,400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported. About 7 percent of th...
  • 1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    1 in 13 U.S. schoolkids takes psych meds

    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.
    More than 7 percent of American schoolchildren are taking at least one medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties, a new government report shows.
ATLANTA (CBS5) -

A fungal infection is becoming an even bigger problem in Arizona and the Southwest, the CDC said in a new report. 

The number of Valley fever cases in Arizona increased from 1,474 in 1998 to 16,467 in 2011, the CDC said.

Adjusting for changes in population demographics, this corresponds to a 16 percent a year increase during the study period, health experts said. 

Between 1998 and 2011, nearly 112,000 cases of Valley fever were reported in 28 states and Washington, DC. Sixty percent of the cases occurred in Arizona. Thirty-one percent were reported in California. 

The number of cases reported in Nevada, New Mexico and Utah combined increased from 72 in 1998 to 237 in 2011.

Valley fever is caused by inhaling a fungus that lives in soil in the Southwest. The fungus becomes airborne when the soil is disturbed.

When signs and symptoms do occur, they appear one to three weeks after exposure. They tend to resemble those of the flu and can range from minor to severe: fever, cough, chest pain, chills, night sweats, headache, fatigue, joint aches, and/or rash, according to Mayo Clinic.

Mayor Clinic says Valley fever, even when it's symptomatic, often clears on its own. Yet for older adults and others at high risk, recovery can be slow, and the risk of developing severe disease is high.

Seek medical care if you are in a high-risk group and develop the signs and symptoms of Valley fever, especially if you: live in or have recently traveled to an area where the disease is common or have symptoms that aren't improving.

Health experts say it's a good idea to watch your pets closely for symptoms because they can come down with Valley fever too.

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

  • KOLD Now FeaturingMore>>

  • Sidebar: Valley fever symptoms

    Valley fever symptoms

    Friday, April 11 2014 12:13 PM EDT2014-04-11 16:13:07 GMT
    Symptoms are not unique to Valley Fever (acute coccidioidomycosis) and tend to resemble those of flu. Specific laboratory tests are used to identify Valley Fever. Fever Cough Chest pain — varying from
    Symptoms are not unique to valley fever (acute coccidioidomycosis) and tend to resemble those of flu. Specific laboratory tests are used to identify valley fever. Fever Cough Chest pain — varying from
Powered by WorldNow