Cleaner power could mean higher costs for water - Tucson News Now

Cleaner power could mean higher costs for water

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Today is Earth Day and Arizona is looking at a proposal to clean up the haze in the air, but it could cost resident's more every time they turn on the faucet in their home.

It is neither easy nor cheap to move water from the Colorado River into Pima County, and it may get more expensive.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) wants to remove some of the haze from national parks and wilderness areas throughout Arizona. 

To do that the EPA is requiring an upgrade to the coal power plant in the northern part of the state.  The same plant that pumps water in the CAP canal, uphill, to Tucson.

That would mean higher energy bills for CAP and right on down the line to the water users.  Water costs could rise as much as 12 percent for Tucson and other major cities, and the number could be triple that for farmers.

The cost increase will likely not go into effect for at least five years; however, the time for resident's voices to be heard is now.  The public comment period ends in just about two weeks.

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