Local amputee: Boston victims need time to heal - Tucson News Now

Local amputee: Boston victims need time to heal

Bill Wehner (Source: KPHO-TV) Bill Wehner (Source: KPHO-TV)
PHOENIX (CBS5) -

A local amputee has a message for at least 15 people who lost limbs in the Boston bomb explosions.

Getting back to normal is completely possible, but it may take some time. 

Bill Wehner remembers being stuck on the side of Loop 101 in late January 2012 after his motorbike ran out of fuel. 

He was on the phone trying to get help when an impaired driver smashed into him going 70 mph.

"He whacked me," Wehner said.

He was rushed to the hospital and learned he would be losing his right leg.

"Thank God all of the others limbs were still attached," he said. 

Although it was a different circumstance, Wehner said he knows just what the more than one dozen amputee victims from the Boston marathon bombings are going through.

For the folks that are injured and they think their life is over, it's not. He said the key is to stay positive and be patient.

"For me, everything takes forever, and I'm not a patient man," Wehner said. "Even as a two-legged bugger, that was not my thing."

He said what's helped him is getting back to his normal schedule - reading to his son and  helping out with dinner.

"I used to be the chef of the house," he said. "And I'm getting there. I'm not there yet, but we'll get back to it."

Getting back to a normal life is completely possible, but patience is definitely needed, he said.

"Get out there and try and don't just sit around and become an Xbox guy," he said. "Go out there and do stuff. Just try and don't give up."

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved. 

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