Red flag warnings posted for northern AZ - Tucson News Now

Red flag warnings posted for northern AZ

CBS 5 CBS 5
WILLIAMS, AZ (CBS5) -

A Red Flag Warning is in effect through Thursday for much of northern Arizona.

It includes all of the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests due to strong winds and low relative humidity.  

Visitors to the Kaibab and Coconino National Forests are being told to avoid building campfires. The advisory covers all campfires across both forests, including in developed campgrounds.  

Wednesday morning, campfire and smoking restrictions went into effect on the entire Coconino National Forest and on the Williams and Tusayan Ranger Districts of the Kaibab National Forest in an effort to reduce preventable human-caused fires. Restrictions have not yet been implemented on the North Kaibab Ranger District of the Kaibab National Forest.  

A Red Flag Warning occurs when the forecast shows strong wind and low relative humidity, creating an increased potential for large fire growth. The campfire advisory remains in effect until the Red Flag Warning ends. 

Forecasts indicate that over the next several days, periods of strong winds will combine with low relative humidity to create critical fire weather conditions.

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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