Flood victims prep for monsoon - Tucson News Now

Flood victims prep for monsoon

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

The monsoon that brings relief is also flooding some neighborhoods with concern.
 
Residents living in the Palo Verde neighborhood near Country Club and Grant are on high alert every time those storm clouds roll in. Flooding is always a big concern in the area; it's a battle the neighborhood association has been fighting with the city and county for years.

The streets at the corner of Camilla and Seneca look like raging rivers after a hard rain.

City officials have put in grates to catch the water but residents call this a joke, saying it doesn't help at all.

Chuck Josephson knows the effects of this flooding firsthand. He has suffered tens of thousands of dollars in damages.
 
"We're standing at the front door trying to keep the water out.  Trying and trying," he said. "It's absolutely impossible. Then it came gushing in, almost a foot high in my garage."
 
And he's not the only one.
 
"The flooding actually comes out of nowhere," said Frank Mendez, a victim of street flooding. "The manhole covers will actually pop off from the pressure when the water starts flowing."
 
They've seen trash cans, debris and even people floating down the street on inner tubes, which is not funny for residents who are spending tens of thousands of dollars building walls around their homes and stacking sandbags.
 
"I had the entire front yard raised about six inches it wasn't enough to stop it," Josephson said.
 
After 32 years on this street, Josephson says the problems started more than a decade ago when the county made some changes to the drainage system farther down the road.
 
"When I went to the county to complain, they said well you live in a flood plain, the drainage is supposed to go through your property."

"Frankly, I think this is their fault. You can't have a property that's been without flooding for 40 years then all of a sudden flooding starts and it's an act of God? Baloney."
 
Residents in the Palo Verde neighborhood have met with city and county officials for several years. Officials have discussed helping residents out with building walls around their properties, but many feel that's not enough. They plan to go back before council and ADOT officials to try to find more permanent solutions.

Copyright 2013 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

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