Annual trauma conference shows off new treatments - Tucson News Now

Annual trauma conference shows off new treatments

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The IT clamp is applied to a bleeding wound and seals it shut, stopping bleeding almost instantly. The IT clamp is applied to a bleeding wound and seals it shut, stopping bleeding almost instantly.
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

This is the 24th year of the Southwest Regional Trauma Conference and organizers say each year it gets bigger.

This year, an estimated 600 people will attend the 2-day conference, and more than 40 vendors from all over are set up inside the Starr Pass Resort to talk about the new and best ways to treat trauma patients.

One of the newer tools we learned about today is the "IT clamp hemmorage control device."

It's designed for the lowest level care provider: people like first responders who are often first to respond to an incident with multiple trauma patients.

The clamp is applied to a bleeding wound and seals it shut, stopping bleeding almost instantly.

"Most of the technologies out there are either tunicates, which cut off blood flow or it's direct pressure where you just put pressure on the wound," said Steven Dralle with Innovative Trauma Care. "Instead of doing that, we, in a way, do direct pressure, but we let the body do it itself. So we seal the wound and then the blood generates the pressure for us, so we don't have to sit there and hold pressure for minutes or anything like that."

"Vendors pay $1,600 for a booth here, a good investment I'm told because the attendees are medics, EMS providers, nurses and law enforcement; people who might use some of these products"

They listen to speakers at what's become one of the country's largest trauma conferences.

Gilbert Pineda, who helped after last year's July mass shooting in Aurora, Colo., spoke today and says the conference is beneficial in many ways.  

"You get to meet people and you get to talk about things that you experience that are very similar," Pineda said. "For instance, the shooting as I mentioned. It's connecting, it's networking and it's sharing experiences besides just sitting and receiving information and knowledge."

Dr. Peter Rhee, who helped former congresswoman Gabby Giffords after Tucson's mass shooting was also here today.

This is a 2-day conference with events going on throughout the night tonight and continuing again Friday morning.

For more information, visit http://www.swtrauma.com/.

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