Unusual crime on the rise around Tucson - Tucson News Now

Unusual crime on the rise around Tucson

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Arizona is being hit with a specific crime, especially hard – stealing tailgates off from trucks.

Thieves can grab the tailgate and be gone in less than a minute.  Stealing a tailgate is fast and quick money for thieves.

It can happen in a parking lot, apartment complex, on a street, almost anywhere a truck is parked.

One or two thieves come up to the truck, open the tailgate, unhook the straps, release a couple of bolts and the tailgate is gone in less than 30 seconds.

The criminals can then sell the tailgate for several hundred dollars, depending on the model or if it has a back up camera. 

Tailgate stealing has become more prevalent in the last few years.  And according to the National Insurance Crime Bureau, since 2006 Arizona has had the third most reports of the crime.

Locally, over the past few months, there have been several reports of tailgate thefts in areas surrounding Tucson.

The Tucson Police Department does not keep specific numbers for tailgate thefts, but adds them in with all car part thefts.

There are several ways truck owners can protect themselves – lock their tailgate if there is one; park under a light if possible; there are even after market products that can be installed that make it tougher for thieves to pull off this tailgate ‘smash and grab' job.

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