Government shutdown impacts travel plans for Marana family - Tucson News Now

Government shutdown impacts travel plans for Marana family

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TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

The government shutdown has made some families reconsider their travel plans. A Marana couple had been planning for a year to go to the Grand Canyon but had to stay home because of the park's closure.

"We won't be needing the 20 percent protein," Dana Elmer said about having to return a bunch of snacks. She was planning on taking them with her to the Grand Canyon but her trip got canceled because of the government shutdown.

"It's a disappointment when you plan for something and you're excited about something and you get 26 other people to do it with you," Elmer said.

Elmer's friend, Sherida Anderson, was looking forward to going. It would've been her first time hiking 23 miles across the canyon.

"It was going to be the perfect day weather wise. It was going to be cooler there really cold at the top but at the bottom really hot. Everything was working out, the stars were lining," Anderson said.

She and her husband David had been training for this all year. Sherida snapped pictures at hiking trails around Tucson, building her endurance for the long hike ahead.

"About the time I told the guys at work, they were talking about the shutdown and everyone started teasing me, 'oh you won't go, they will shut down the government,' and I started thinking... 'Yeah, they really might shut down the government and sure enough it happened,'" David Anderson said.

Now, each couple is out a $150 because one of the hotels they reserved isn't budging.

"They treat us as a tour group when in fact we were just a group of friends doing it. So, they don't want to reimburse our full refund on that," Elmer said.

A trip to the Grand Canyon that's now costing a grand penny.

"It's wasted money and that's hard on us to but it's sad we didn't get to go but honestly, I'm more sad that elected politicians can't work together to work it out," Sherida Anderson said.

The group is still fighting to get their full refund. They aren't complaining though, they know others are feeling the effects of this shutdown a lot worse.

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