National Park Service gives options for CO River permit holders - Tucson News Now

National Park Service gives options for CO River permit holders

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

The National Park Service announced Monday that people who have a Colorado River permit for the Grand Canyon will get a refund for their permit fees.

The Grand Canyon has been closed to the public for nearly a week, since the federal government shut own.

Twenty-one private river launches and six commercial launches were scheduled over the first two weeks in October. 

Permit holders can choose to reschedule a river trip on their choice of dates this year through 2016. They will have to submit their choices within 60 days after the government reopens.

"The Park worked closely with affected parties to develop this plan, and I appreciate their understanding and support," Park Superintendent Dave Uberuaga stated in a news release. 

Park officials said each permit holder will receive details that outline the options in the plan.

Copyright 2013 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

  • New Orleans sits atop an ancient barrier island

    New Orleans sits atop an ancient barrier island

    To the casual observer, this looks like any other section of marsh. However, this spot in extreme Eastern New Orleans-- almost at the St. Tammany Parish line-- is unique. 

    To the casual observer, this looks like any other section of marsh. However, this spot in extreme Eastern New Orleans-- almost at the St. Tammany Parish line-- is unique. 

Powered by Frankly