Training to drive a PCSD vehicle - Tucson News Now

Training to drive a PCSD vehicle

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TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

It was a day at the track I won't ever forget. I got the rare chance to drive a Pima County Sheriff's Deputy vehicle.

It was a training day at Musselman Honda Circuit near the Pima County Fairgrounds. PCSD was sharing and showing the techniques they use to train deputies.

They began with what seemed like a roller coaster ride on 4 wheels. The instructors took our group on the course. The car was put in reverse and we were off going more than 40 miles per hour backwards. In a split second, we did a 180 and were going forward. They call this maneuver a "J Turn." Sgt. Jeffrey Copfer from PCSD said, "it's basically an avoidance exercise, if you have to get out of a tight spot or an alley, someone is coming at you, you can escape quickly."

The course is something that each Sheriff's Deputy has to go through during a week long class. They have to complete 2 courses and several maneuvers. Once you become a deputy, you have to take the course every 3 years. "We teach them and show them, that when you slow your hands down, your feet down and your brain slows down and your thought process are much clearer and you're not going to run into things you really shouldn't run into," said Sgt. Copfer.

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