A look back on Superstorm Sandy, one year later - Tucson News Now

A look back on Superstorm Sandy, one year later

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It's been one year since residents of the Northeast were bracing for Superstorm Sandy.  (Source: MGN Online) It's been one year since residents of the Northeast were bracing for Superstorm Sandy. (Source: MGN Online)

(RNN) - Tuesday marks the one-year anniversary since Superstorm Sandy hit the northeastern U.S.

The video above shows a glimpse of Sandy's strength and scope of the damage caused by last year's storm as it came ashore.

Superstorm Sandy started out as Hurricane Sandy. Although it was a Category 1 storm, it was the largest Atlantic hurricane on record and the second only to Katrina as costliest, according to National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The hurricane merged with a winter storm, making Sandy 1,000 miles wide, and came ashore during high tide.

According to FEMA reports, the massive storm killed at least 162 people and caused nearly $50 billion in property damage.

Much of the debris from the storm is now gone, yet communities are still in the midst of rebuilding.

Copyright 2013 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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