Plane becomes canvas at Pima Air & Space Museum - Tucson News Now

Plane becomes canvas at Pima Air & Space Museum

Source:  Jason Wawro/Pima Air & Space Museum Source: Jason Wawro/Pima Air & Space Museum
Source: Jason Wawro/Pima Air & Space Museum Source: Jason Wawro/Pima Air & Space Museum
Source: John Bezosky/Pima Air & Space Source: John Bezosky/Pima Air & Space

TUCSON (Tucson News Now) - It might not fly anymore, but an old plane is soaring with imagination.

The Pima Air & Space Museum is unveiling of a Lockheed Jetstar used as a canvas by contemporary artist KennyScharf, entitled "Back To Supersonica." "Back to Supersonica" joins two other"Round Trip: Art from the Bone Yard Project" painted planes — a C-45 painted byFaile and a VC-140 painted by Andrew Schoultz — prominently displayed on the museum grounds along Valencia Roadnear the museum's entrance.

The planes are part of a project conceived in 2010 by gallery owner Eric Firestone,and organized with curator Carlo McCormick.  It resurrectsdisused airplanes and parts from America's military history and turns them into artist tools.  With a nod to the airplane graffiti and "nose art‟ that became popularduring WWII, the Museum says the project offers a vision of the wonder by which humanity takesto the air through some of the most prominent and acclaimed artists workingtoday.

More than 30 artists have participated in "Round Trip"including DC Super 3 planes painted by graffiti artists How & Nosm, Nunca,and Retna. These three planes are also on display at the Pima Air & Space Museum.

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