antibodies-online.com Supports the Resource Identification Initiative With Free Stuff for Beta Testers - Tucson News Now

antibodies-online.com Supports the Resource Identification Initiative With Free Stuff for Beta Testers

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SOURCE antibodies-online GmbH

SAN DIEGO, Atlanta and AACHEN, Germany, February 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --

Research resources reported in the biomedical literature often lack sufficient detail to be uniquely identified, which can hinder scientific reproducibility. To address this problem, an international collaboration between researchers, program officers, vendors, curators, editors, computer scientists and publishers has started the Resource Identification Initiative.

 The beta test preceding the pilot phase is recruiting researchers to test the system. "antibodies-online.com rewards every participant with a free t-shirt or a coffee mug", says Dr. Andreas Kessell, Co-founder of antibodies-online.com. Participants should follow the instructions on http://www.antibodies-online.com/resource-identification-initiative.

The Initiative aims to address the issue of resource identification within the biomedical literature by promoting the use of unique identifiers for research materials. The goal is to include unique identifiers alongside the mention of all key resources in publications. The project is sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility, and being led by a diverse collaboration including the Neuroscience Information Framework and the Oregon Health & Science University Library, working with many others through FORCE11.

The initiative is also designed to help resource providers to track usage of resources and to measure impacts of funding. "The requirements are that resources are identified in such a manner that they are identified uniquely and are machine readable, are available outside the paywall and are uniform across publishers and journals", says Dr. Maryann Martone, NIF Project Lead and Professor, Department of Neuroscience, University of California, San Diego.

Media Contacts

Patrik von Glasow

PR Manager, antibodies-online GmbH

Email: patrik.vonglasow@antibodies-online.com

Tel.:  +4924193672533

With more than 1,000,000 products antibodies-online.com is the biggest distributor for proteomics research worldwide.

Maryann Martone

NIF Project Lead

Email: maryann@ncmir.ucsd.edu

The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of Web-based neuroscience resources.

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

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