Vote for your favorite Comet ISON picture - Tucson News Now

Vote for your favorite Comet ISON picture

Posted: Updated:
Source: NSF/WIYN Source: NSF/WIYN
  • Most ReadMost ReadMore>>

  • Nogales border fence knocked down by storm

    Nogales border fence knocked down by storm

    Monday, July 28 2014 7:57 AM EDT2014-07-28 11:57:01 GMT
    Border Patrol officials in Nogales say operations are back to normal after a section of the border wall was knocked down.
    Border Patrol officials in Nogales say operations are back to normal after a section of the border wall was knocked down.
  • Man dropped off at hospital with gunshot wound

    Man dropped off at hospital with gunshot wound

    Man dropped off at hospital with gunshot wound

    Monday, July 28 2014 5:37 AM EDT2014-07-28 09:37:03 GMT
    Sergeant Chris Widmer tweeted out the update. He says the 23-year-old man was dropped off at a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries.
    Sergeant Chris Widmer tweeted out the update. He says the 23-year-old man was dropped off at a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries.
  • Tucson Streetcar has reported 25,000 riders on Saturday

    Tucson Streetcar has reported 25,000 riders on Saturday

    Sunday, July 27 2014 7:06 PM EDT2014-07-27 23:06:30 GMT
    With free rides being offered all weekend, the streetcar remained packed through its first two days and was busy once again on Sunday.
    With free rides being offered all weekend, the streetcar remained packed through its first two days and was busy once again on Sunday.

Comet ISON was a sun-diving comet, destroyed by the sun's heat as it grazed near the sun on Thanksgiving last year.  

The comet's movement excited astronomers because it was one of the first times a sun-diving comet could be easily tracked in the sky, both from Earth and satellites, on a journey towards the sun. 

Now you can pick your favorite picture of ISON in a contest sponsored by the National Science Foundation. 

Click here to vote.

Comet ISON was discovered in September 2012 by two astronomers in Russia. 

The comet gets its name from by the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON).

The Russian astronomers found the comet using a telescope in the ISON partnership, which spans about 30 telescopes in 10 countries.  

Click here for an interactive map of Comet ISON as it flies through the solar system.

After the first detection, astronomers looked through past space images and discovered the comet was seen by the Mount Lemmon Survey in December 2011. 

In June 2013, Comet ISON moved behind the sun and out of view from Earth.

According to EarthSky.org, an amateur astronomer, Bruce Gary, in Hereford, Arizona was the first to spot Comet ISON after it emerged from behind the sun in August.

Far away from city lights, Gary operates two powerful telescopes in two separate structures.

Visit Gary's Hereford Arizona Observatory page by clicking here.

The video below is of Comet ISON as it approached the sun on Thanksgiving.  

ISON got as close as around 730,000 miles, which in space distance is a close call!

These images were captured from NASA's Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).

 

 Copyright 2013 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.


Powered by WorldNow