Everyday Health, Inc. Files Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering of Common Stock - Tucson News Now

Everyday Health, Inc. Files Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering of Common Stock

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SOURCE Everyday Health, Inc.

NEW YORK, Feb. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Everyday Health, Inc. ("Everyday Health") announced today that it has filed a registration statement on Form S-1 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") relating to a proposed initial public offering of shares of its common stock. The number of shares to be offered and the price range for the proposed offering have not been determined. A portion of the shares will be issued and sold by Everyday Health, and a portion is expected to be sold by certain stockholders of the company.  Everyday Health plans to list its common stock on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol "EVDY."

J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC and Citigroup Global Markets Inc. are acting as joint book-running managers for the proposed offering. Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Incorporated and SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, Inc. are acting as co-managers. 

The offering will be made only by means of a prospectus. A copy of the preliminary prospectus, when available, may be obtained from: J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Attention: Broadridge Financial Solutions, 1155 Long Island Avenue, Edgewood, NY 11717 or by telephone at (866) 803-9204; Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC Prospectus Department, One Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10010, by telephone at (800) 221-1037 or by email at newyork.prospectus@credit-suisse.com; or Citigroup Global Markets Inc., c/o Broadridge Financial Solutions, 1155 Long Island Avenue, Edgewood, NY 11717, by telephone at (800) 831-9146 or by email at batprospectusdept@citi.com.

A registration statement relating to these securities has been filed with the SEC but has not yet become effective. These securities may not be sold nor may offers to buy be accepted prior to the time the registration statement becomes effective.

This press release shall not constitute an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy, nor shall there be any sale of these securities in any state or jurisdiction in which such offer, solicitation or sale would be unlawful prior to registration or qualification under the securities laws of any such state or jurisdiction.

About Everyday Health, Inc.

Everyday Health is a leading provider of digital health and wellness solutions. Everyday Health combines premier digital content from leading health brands with sophisticated data and analytics technology to provide a highly personalized and differentiated content experience to our users. During 2013, an estimated average of 43 million consumers and 500,000 healthcare professionals, including one-third of all U.S. physicians, engaged with Everyday Health's health and wellness properties each month across multiple channels, including the web, mobile devices, video and social media.

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

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