Scripps Clinic First to Implant Miniature Cardiac Monitor - Tucson News Now

Scripps Clinic First to Implant Miniature Cardiac Monitor

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SOURCE Scripps Health

Small, wireless monitor provides long-term remote monitoring to help physicians diagnose and monitor irregular heartbeats

SAN DIEGO, Feb. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Scripps Green Hospital has become the first hospital in the United States to implant the world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device. Scripps Clinic cardiologist John Rogers, M.D., successfully completed the first implant of the Reveal LINQ™ Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM)  in 71-year-old San Diego resident Chuck Beal on Saturday.

(Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20140224/LA70929

(Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20121018/LA95241LOGO

Cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Feb. 19, the LINQ™ ICM from Medtronic is approximately one-third the size of an AAA battery, making it more than 80 percent smaller than other ICMs currently available.

Beal, the owner of San Diego-based Beal Racing, has a lengthy history of heart palpitations, and is at an elevated risk for stroke following a previous heart valve replacement, making him a prime candidate for the LINQ ICM.

"Mr. Beal was given a local anesthetic and the device was inserted under the skin of the chest wall. The entire process took about 10 minutes and he was able to go home immediately after," said Dr. Rogers. "The monitor is so discreet that it is unlikely that he will even know it is there and he can go about his life without interruption or discomfort from the device."

In addition to its continuous and wireless monitoring capabilities, the system provides remote monitoring through the Carelink® Network. Through the Carelink Network, physicians can request notifications to alert them if their patients have had cardiac events. The Reveal LINQ ICM is indicated for patients who experience symptoms such as dizziness, palpitation, syncope (fainting) and chest pain that may suggest a cardiac arrhythmia, and for patients at increased risk for cardiac arrhythmias.

"I thought it was pretty exciting to be the first person to have the device implanted in me," said Beal. "I feel much better knowing that my heart rhythm is being monitored at all times and that ultimately I may be able to reduce some of the medications that I am currently taking."

Placed just beneath the skin through a small incision of less than 1 centimeter in the upper left side of the chest, the Reveal LINQ ICM is often nearly invisible to the naked eye once inserted. The device is placed using a minimally invasive insertion procedure, which simplifies the experience for both physicians and their patients. The Reveal LINQ ICM is MR-Conditional, allowing patients to undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) if needed.

ABOUT SCRIPPS HEALTH  
Founded in 1924 by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps, Scripps Healthis a nonprofit integrated health system based in San Diego, Calif. Scripps treats a half-million patients annually through the dedication of 2,600 affiliated physicians and 13,500 employees among its five acute-care hospital campuses, hospice and home health care services, and an ambulatory care network of physician offices and 26 outpatient centers and clinics.  Recognized as a leader in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, Scripps is also at the forefront of clinical research, genomic medicine, wireless health care and graduate medical education. With three highly respected graduate medical education programs, Scripps is a longstanding member of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Truven Health Analytics (formerly Thomson Reuters) has named Scripps one of the top five large health systems in the nation. Scripps is nationally recognized in six specialties by U.S. News & World Report, which places Scripps cardiovascular program among the top 20 in the country. Scripps has been consistently recognized by Fortune, Working Mother magazine and AARP as one of the best places in the nation to work. More information can be found at www.scripps.org.

©2012 PR Newswire. All Rights Reserved.

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