McDonald's offers free breakfast for AIMS test prep - Tucson News Now

McDonald's offers free breakfast for AIMS test prep

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

A major fast food chain will help students in Southern Arizona get ready for AIMS testing.

McDonald's invites third through eighth graders to stop by restaurants for a free breakfast April 7 through 8 from 6 to 9 a.m.

The breakfast offer includes an Egg McMuffin®, Apple Slices, and a choice of 1 percent milk, fat free chocolate milk or a small Minute Maid® orange juice, according to a news release. 

"Whether students eat at home, at their schools or at McDonald's, it's important to have a well-balanced breakfast every day, especially before taking an exam like the AIMS," said Michael Osborne, Tucson McDonald's owner and operator. "As many members of the McDonald's family are parents themselves, we feel it is important for us to contribute to the well being of children in our communities. A wholesome breakfast that includes food groups like fruit, whole grains and low-fat milk will help provide the fuel and nutrients students need to start the day."

Last year, Arizona McDonald's restaurants served free breakfast to more than 84,000 students on the first two exam days.

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

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