Fort Thomas considers lifting pit bull ban - Tucson News Now

Fort Thomas considers lifting pit bull ban

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FORT THOMAS, KY (FOX19) -

In 2012, the city of Cincinnati rescinded its ban on pit bulls and now the debate on how cities should regulate ownership is heating up in Northern Kentucky.
 
Fort Thomas is considering lifting its ban after nearly 30 years.

Several cities have had the discussion of if they should treat pit bulls the same as other dog breeds.
 
"I think city councils and municipalities put things in place to protect their citizens and this one is just a misplaced legislative piece of information," said Katy Blanton.
 
Katy Blanton with Cincinnati Pit Crew says she's trying to erase the negative stigma surrounding these dogs.
 
"When you take the time to get to know them and understand who they are, and the type of dog they are, and how good they can be for your family," said Blanton.
 
The ban in Fort Thomas has been tough on some. A year and a half ago, animal control stopped Kevin Bunge because of what his dog looked liked.
 
"She gave me a notice that I had to get him out of Fort Thomas in five days," said Kevin Bunge.
 
He then got a DNA test to confirm that his dog was half American Bull Dog, half Jack Russell. But his troubles didn't end there.
 
"About two months ago I got stopped by a Fort Thomas police woman here while I was in the dog park and told me I had to take him out of the dog park, which I didn't do," said Bunge.
 
But others say the ban should stay in effect for another 30 years.
 
"It's always the pit bulls that are attacking people or killing them. They're mean dogs, they're trained to attack and fight," said Steve Evans.
 
Nearly 20 nearby cities have some sort of restricting laws concerning pit bull ownership. If a change is made in Fort Thomas, the city is looking into either lifting the pit bull ban completely, or allowing the breed but implementing a different dangerous animal ordinance.
 
"We're just looking to ask communities to really take a look at their ordinances and say do we have a pit bull problem or do we have a irresponsible ownership problem," said Blanton.
 
City officials say they plan to have more public hearings before making any changes to the ordinance. It'll be at least a couple months before anything is decided.

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