Volunteers to walk the San Pedro River measuring, mapping water - Tucson News Now

Volunteers to walk the San Pedro River measuring, mapping water

Volunteers will walk along the San Pedro River to measure where water is located, according to The Nature Conservancy. (Source: Melissa Magyar/The Nature Conservancy) Volunteers will walk along the San Pedro River to measure where water is located, according to The Nature Conservancy. (Source: Melissa Magyar/The Nature Conservancy)
  • Most ReadMost ReadMore>>

  • Less-than-stellar ranking stuns Tucson veterans

    Less-than-stellar ranking stuns Tucson veterans

    Monday, November 20 2017 10:45 PM EST2017-11-21 03:45:21 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    "If I was going to die some place, that appreciates veterans, it would be Tucson, Arizona," said Army Veteran Duke Snyder. "They're going to bury me in this desert. I love this place."

    "If I was going to die some place, that appreciates veterans, it would be Tucson, Arizona," said Army Veteran Duke Snyder. "They're going to bury me in this desert. I love this place."

  • Charlotte International is latest nonstop service for Tucson

    Charlotte International is latest nonstop service for Tucson

    Monday, November 20 2017 10:38 PM EST2017-11-21 03:38:10 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    The announcement from airport staff on Monday, November 20, follows similar news less than a week earlier for service to Austin, Texas. 

    The announcement from airport staff on Monday, November 20, follows similar news less than a week earlier for service to Austin, Texas. 

  • Police: Woman confessed to putting babies in concrete in 90s

    Police: Woman confessed to putting babies in concrete in 90s

    Tuesday, November 21 2017 1:51 AM EST2017-11-21 06:51:08 GMT
    Tuesday, November 21 2017 5:07 AM EST2017-11-21 10:07:25 GMT

    The woman was quoted by police as saying she put the bodies into concrete from 1992 through 1997 because she had been too poor to raise them, but she had been filled with guilt over the years.

    The woman was quoted by police as saying she put the bodies into concrete from 1992 through 1997 because she had been too poor to raise them, but she had been filled with guilt over the years.

By Angeline Carbajal / Tucson News Now intern

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - More than 120 volunteers will use GPS technology to help map where the San Pedro River contains water.

The volunteers will walk along the river on Saturday to measure where water is located, according to a news release from the Nature Conservancy.

Volunteers from the Nature Conservancy, the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Borderlands Restoration, Arizona Game and Fish, Community Watershed Alliance of Benson and many others gather together each year for the effort.

The mapping of more than 300 miles will occur from 6 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Saturday.

The increasing demands of water along with drought conditions have affected water availability in the San Pedro River basin for people and nature.

According to the release, millions of birds use this migratory pathway each year.

Conservationists find the mapping effort extremely important in determining the river's long-term trends, which helps Cochise County, Fort Huachuca and the Nature Conservancy to design recharge facilities that will put water back into the ground.

Last June, volunteers found that only 32 percent of the river contained water before the monsoon rains began.

The first recharge facility for storm water is currently under construction.

The San Pedro River flows from headwaters in Mexico to its confluence with the Gila River near Winkelman, and the basin includes tributaries such as the Babocomari River, Aravaipa Creek, and Hot Springs Canyon among others.

Anyone interested in more information about the San Pedro River mapping can visit http://www.nature.org/Arizona.

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly