ACA workers take the heat - Tucson News Now

ACA workers take the heat

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TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

It's 103 degrees and the humidity makes it feel more than that.

The sidewalk is hot to the touch.

Still, a trio of twenty something's are pounding the pavement, going door to door, trying to get someone to listen to their sales pitch.

They work for Enroll America, the organization trying to get people to sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Obamacare as it's called by some.

The first stop, the Empire Beauty School, gets them swiftly escorted out of the building.

"A rejection is a response," says Razanne Chatila, putting a positive spin on it.

The others says "maybe the camera freaked them out."

Still, when it comes to cold calls, rejection is just part of the effort.

"At least we made contact with a member of the community," says Chatila.

Six tries, six failures until they walk into Casa Video on Speedway.

 "We're not trying to sell you insurance or anything like that," she says.  "We're just giving out information."

Dakota Johnson gladly accepts it for him and the other 11 employees.

He's been without health insurance for a couple of years and gets a bit scared sometimes.

"I'm getting up there in age," Johnson says. 

Arizona is one of 36 states which have set up exchanges to sell insurance. 

It offers 100 plans and has signed up 120,000 people.

An average silver plan with subsidies is about $94 a month.

The hope is by working the summer to make people aware, when the new sign up period opens this fall, people will be prepared.

"We have research which shows don't respond until three or four contacts, sixth or seventh contact," says Brandon Patrick, who works to enroll people in Pima County. "And we're going to keep trying until they tell us they have insurance of they're not interested period."
Tucson, 

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