Gov. Brewer reacts to blocked driver's license policy - Tucson News Now

Gov. Brewer reacts to blocked driver's license policy

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TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer is planning her next move after an appeals court Monday blocked her policy of denying driver's licenses to young immigrants with work permits under the Obama Administration’s deferred deportation policy.

In a tweet after the ruling, Brewer blamed President Obama for the current immigration crisis and said Arizona will continue to fight and demand secure borders.

The ruling is a blow to Arizona's governor and a win for DACA recipients, young people who are protected from deportation by DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

The Obama Administration created DACA in June of 2012. Young people who meet certain requirements and who were brought to the United States as children may become DACA recipients. They are allowed to work and go to public school.

However, before Monday's ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in Arizona they were not allowed to get driver's licenses.

Gov. Brewer had issued an executive order to deny the licenses. Her attorneys argue driver's licenses might be used to get public benefits to which the DACA recipients were not entitled.

Local immigrant advocates are pleased with the latest court order that has come as a lawsuit against Arizona's drivers's license policy winds its way through the courts.

"The court, said, in the meantime, while this case is pending, those young people are suffering irreparable harm by not being able to drive. And the other thing that's very important is- the court said it is likely that they will prevail on the merits, that they are being treated unequally, and in the United States that's not permitted," says DACA Volunteer Attorney Margo Cowan.

In other words, the court says the state is probably destined to lose the lawsuit against it.

"We're going to be able to get to school faster, to our meetings and- I don't know- something that we don't have to worry about," says DACA recipient Grecia Rivas.

Meanwhile, many DACA recipients have reached another milestone. It's their two-year anniversary.

There are about 750,000 so-called “Dreamers” in the United States. Approximately 19,000 of them are in Arizona. The first recipients signed up two years ago. That means it's now time for them to renew for another two years, if they want.

"They have to pay another $465. They've got to take photographs again and they fill out an application indicating that they've not left the country since June of 2012, unless they've had authority, pre-approved by the government and so they're going to apply again. WE expect for new people to apply too--people who've never applied," says Isabel Garcia, Co-chairperson of Derechos Humanos a local human rights organization.

To see read the entire ruling, click here.

To see Governor Brewer's written response click here.

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