Viral videos aim to protect children from being left in hot cars - Tucson News Now

Viral videos aim to protect children from being left in hot cars

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The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions, to see how hot conditions can get in just 10 minutes. (Photo Source: YouTube) The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions, to see how hot conditions can get in just 10 minutes. (Photo Source: YouTube)
This is a nationwide effort to bring awareness to this issue. (Photo Source: YouTube) This is a nationwide effort to bring awareness to this issue. (Photo Source: YouTube)

(WMC) – As temperatures climb into the 90s, it's a good time to remind you to make sure no one gets left behind in a hot car. Now some people are using viral videos to get that message across.

WMC Action News 5 has already reported about children who died after being left in hot cars.

Those tragedies prompted people all over the country to create viral videos in hopes that people will see them, remember them, and make sure their children are not left in the sweltering heat.

One person who made a video was Officer David Melancon from the Thibodaux Police Department in Louisiana. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions, to see how hot conditions can get in just 10 minutes.

"There's no way that this can be healthy for a child. So parents, guardians, I want to encourage you. You may be running into the store for a couple of minutes. Please, please, do not leave a child in a hot car," Officer Melancon said.

This is a nationwide effort to bring awareness to this issue. Here are some more ways to help remind you, when you're busy, that a child is in the back seat:

One way is to put a purse, cellphone or something else you'll need in the back seat. Another way is to keep a toy in your child's car seat and put it in the front seat when you strap your child in to serve as a reminder he or she is in the back.

Tennessee state law states that if you see a child left alone in a car, you are allowed to break into the vehicle only after you call police.

Department of Transportation's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has launched a campaign that is warning parents and caregivers of young children to be mindful that it doesn't take long for a child to die of heatstroke if left unattended in a parked car. Click here to learn more: http://www.safercar.gov/parents/heatstroke.htm.

Copyright 2014 WMC Action News 5. All rights reserved.

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