Arizona Aftershocks - Tucson News Now

Arizona Aftershocks

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Another aftershock was felt near Duncan, AZ at 10:33am Friday morning.  This is the 14th aftershock above a 2.8 since the initial June 28th 5.2 magnitude earthquake. There have been hundreds of smaller aftershocks recorded.

Jeri Young, an AZGS geophysicist, said "The Arizona Geological Survey deployed a temporary array of five portable seismometers around the location of the 5.2 main shock in hopes of learning more about the behavior of the earthquakes and faulting in the region."

Senior Geologist, Jon Spencer, explains that our Arizona earthquakes are caused by the Earth's crust in southern Arizona and northern Sonora gradually extending in an east-west direction.

Most of these shocks have been fairly shallow, about 3 miles deep.  However, it's possible these tremors continue for several more months. If you live near the area, be prepared for potential 3.0 to 4.0 magnitude aftershocks in the future.

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