No migrants heading to Oracle, officials say - Tucson News Now

No migrants heading to Oracle, officials say

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - A spokesman at Congressman Raul Grijalva's office in Washington, D.C. said today that Health and Human Services will not be bringing immigrant children to a facility in Oracle today, as previously planned.

No date was given for when or if the transfer would take place.

There was speculation fueled by Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu that a bus load of 40 to 60 children from Central America would be bringing the children to the Sycamore Canyon School near Oracle today.

He said a "couple of whistleblowers" from ICE tipped him off.

A group of 70 to 80 protestors waited several hours for the bus, which never showed up.

Another group, which staged about three miles away, held signs welcoming the children.

Some of those protesting against the busing of the children vowed to stay some saying they will stay through the weekend.

Many thought it was their presence which kept the government from making the planned trip.

There is no confirmation of that.

A U.S. congressman's office says there was never any plan to bus those kids in on Tuesday at the Sycamore Canyon Academy.

Protesters and demonstrators on both sides showed up and some stayed at night.

Most of the protesters left, though a few were still sleeping in the campgrounds by the Boy's Ranch.The big question remains, “Were those buses ever expected to head this way?” 

The Department of Homeland Security is now saying they cannot disclose the locations or times when they will be sending illegal immigrant children to the facilities. Representative Raul Grijalva's office tells Tucson News Now no buses were ever scheduled to head this way "today, tomorrow, or in the near future."

But Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu's office is saying they had information from whistle blowers in the Department of Homeland Security that the buses were expected to arrive in Pinal County on Tuesday. Officials at Sycamore Ranch also say they were asked by the federal government to be ready to take in a small number of children.

"I don’t know what to believe anymore,” protester Brian Taub said. “I think they will sneak them in, in the cover of dark. I don’t trust our government anymore."

Protesters say they plan to stay outside just in case.

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.
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