Family of man taken by BP during traffic stop speaks out - Tucson News Now

Family of man taken by BP during traffic stop speaks out

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Norlan Prado's family spoke out Saturday after Tucson Police officers handed him over to border patrol last weekend after pulling him over for making a wide turn.

You might recall a chaotic scene last Sunday as protesters laid under a border patrol vehicle trying to stop authorities from taking the undocumented man near 22nd street and Columbus Blvd.

Prado's girlfriend, Recce Mabel, who gave birth to Prado's baby girl the same day Tucson Police officers pulled him over.

Speaking Spanish, Mabel said it's been very difficult not having Prado around because he has been the sole supporter of the entire family.

Mabel said police shouldn't have called border patrol. Prado has lived in the United States for nearly 10 years—illegally. It has been a difficult process for Prado to get legal status because of the high cost and the long immigration process, according to Mabel.

Prado is currently behind bars and could be deported back to Nicaragua.

Just this week immigration activist's delivered a letter to Tucson Police Chief, Roberto Villasenor. They are demanding the agency stop calling border patrol during traffic stops. Activists are claiming officers are racial profiling.

Just this week Chief Villasenor said officers are just following the controversial S.B. 1070 law which requires them to notify border patrol if they suspect someone is in the country illegally.

“What we do try and do is recognize the stress this law causes upon the community,” Villasenor said. “You know I was predicting this back in 2010 when the law was first being considered and placed on the books. Unfortunately the Supreme Court did not strike down all components of the law. They left one in place which is causing all the problems right now and my officers are obligated to enforce it."

Chief Villasenor said in the last two months, border patrol has only responded on scene 45 times during a traffic stop involving TPD out of more than 3,000 inquiries to border patrol regarding SB 1070.

Tucson Police said Prado admitted to be in the U.S. illegally and that is why they called border patrol. However, immigration activists and Prado's family dispute the claim.

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

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