Trail projects in Arizona to get funding - Tucson News Now

Trail projects in Arizona to get funding

(Source: Arizona State Parks) (Source: Arizona State Parks)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Nine trail projects in Pima, Pinal and Cochise counties will have additional funds, according to a recent release from Arizona State Parks. This is part of a more than $3 million grant that was approved by the Arizona State Park Board on July 20.  These funds are from the federal Recreational Trails Program and the State's Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Recreation Fund. 

"As leaders of trails across the state, we are proud to be in the position of seeing these projects hit the ground," said Executive Director Sue Black, in a recent release.  Projects that will receive funds range from maintaining and enhancing current trails, to developing new OHV trails in various counties.  

Trail projects in Pima, Cochise, and Pinal counties that will receive grant funds include the following: 

  • Pima - Catalina State Park (non-motorized) $80,000
  • Pima/Pinal - Coronado-Santa Catalina National Forest (non-motorized) $79,887
  • Pima - Climbing Association of Southern Arizona (non-motorized) $73,810
  • Pima - Association of 4 WD Clubs (motorized) $65,220
  • Pima - Oro Valley (non-motorized) $30,000
  • Pima - Marana (non-motorized) $11,000
  • Pinal - Picacho Peak State Park (non-motorized) $30,000
  • Cochise - Kartchner Caverns State Park (non-motorized) $79,348
  • Cochise - Coronado National Forest -- Sierra Vista Ranger District (non-motorized) $30,000

For information about Arizona State Parks and the many recreational, historical and cultural programs call 1-877-MY-PARKS or visit AZStateParks.com

Copyright 2016 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

  • Local newsMore>>

  • Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry

    Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry

    Thursday, June 21 2018 9:49 PM EDT2018-06-22 01:49:37 GMT
    Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry. (Source: Tucson News Now)Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry. (Source: Tucson News Now)
    Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry. (Source: Tucson News Now)Asylum-seeking families wait outside Deconcini Port of Entry. (Source: Tucson News Now)

    As regular crossers make their way into Mexico at the Deconcini Port of Entry, families sleep on the ground steps away in hopes of seeking asylum.

    As regular crossers make their way into Mexico at the Deconcini Port of Entry, families sleep on the ground steps away in hopes of seeking asylum.

  • KOLD INVESTIGATES: Are MS-13 members crossing into Arizona?

    Thursday, June 21 2018 9:28 PM EDT2018-06-22 01:28:42 GMT

    KOLD investigated and found out how big of an issue MS-13 gang members are in our area. MS-13 is a notorious, criminal gang that started in Central America, and some members are now in our country.. President Donald Trump says the MS-13 gang is a huge problem when it comes to immigration. On Wednesday, June 20th he said " we're throwing by the thousands MS-13, they come into the country. 

    KOLD investigated and found out how big of an issue MS-13 gang members are in our area. MS-13 is a notorious, criminal gang that started in Central America, and some members are now in our country.. President Donald Trump says the MS-13 gang is a huge problem when it comes to immigration. On Wednesday, June 20th he said " we're throwing by the thousands MS-13, they come into the country. 

  • "Bee" aware of swarming dangers in SE Arizona

    "Bee" aware of swarming dangers in SE Arizona

    Thursday, June 21 2018 9:24 PM EDT2018-06-22 01:24:07 GMT

    A buzz around Southeastern Arizona could lead to dangerous, even deadly situations with the Africanized bee.   "During the summer months or the fall months, when mother nature is not producing any food, they do get a lot more aggressive," said Chris Brinton, Owner and Operator of Bee Bustin and Life'Sweet Honey Farms. "They are going to come after you a lot more aggressively," It's a danger ...

    A buzz around Southeastern Arizona could lead to dangerous, even deadly situations with the Africanized bee. "During the summer months or the fall months, when mother nature is not producing any food, they do get a lot more aggressive," said Chris Brinton, Owner and Operator of Bee B

Powered by Frankly