UA wants to digitize, include your memories in history of Tucson - Tucson News Now

UA wants to digitize, include your memories in history of Tucson area

University of Arizona library staff trains for Community Digitization Day. (Source: KOLD News 13) University of Arizona library staff trains for Community Digitization Day. (Source: KOLD News 13)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

If you have pictures, documents, letters or other interesting items that you would like preserved digitally, the University of Arizona is holding a Community Digitization Day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 4.

The event will be at Special Collections at the UA, 1510 E. University Boulevard (University and Cherry Avenue).

The University Libraries will scan your memories onto a USB drive.

You'll get the drive at no charge, and take that and your originals home.

There will be workshops on how to preserve photographs.

You may want to arrange a private consultation with a curator.

The staff also will show samples of preservation materials and ways to care for historical artifacts.

The libraries' staff is hoping you will, in turn, let them add your memories to an online archive.  
   
The University Libraries are asking you bring items related to Tucson and the borderlands region from the period 1900-1970.

Advance registration is suggested, but not required, by calling 520-626-8332.

You may have up to 10 pieces scanned.

They include printed materials, including photographs printed on paper.

The maximum size is 14 x 16 inches.

Collecting personal photographs and documents from many different people helps  reveal a picture of our community.

"One of the important roles of Special Collections is to help preserve our shared cultural heritage," said Steve Hussman, director of Special Collections, according to a news release.

"What I"m hoping to impart to the community is how important their materials are. Their photographs, their letters, their love letters that they've written to each other, documents that they've picked up, maybe at churches because that's how we see the history of the community," said UA Libraries Special Collections Borderland Curator Veronica Reyes-Escudero.     

"What was important to them? What wasn't important to them? Where did they live? What part of the community is still there? What part of the community isn't? What changed over time? That's what we want to see represented in our archives," said Reyes-Escudero.

It's giving a voice to the people who made our community what it is.
 
"It's interesting to me because these are stories that haven't typically been told before. There are some typical narratives to history, particularly here in the Southwest, and what history looks like. And so I think what my purpose is is to sort of diversify that and to honor people with telling their stories," said UA Libraries Special Collections Graduate Assistant Zazil-xa Davis-Vazquez. 

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