Oro Valley fundraiser benefits domestic violence center - Tucson News Now

Oro Valley fundraiser benefits domestic violence center

Sunday's event benefited Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse (Source: Tucson News Now). Sunday's event benefited Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse (Source: Tucson News Now).
ORO VALLEY, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

A women's group in Oro Valley made the most of their charitable opportunity Sunday.

The auditorium at Sun City Oro Valley Adult Activity Retirement Community was packed full, as those in attendance shined a bright light on the horrors of domestic violence and abuse.

"I think about the moms up all night with their kids because they can't sleep at all," said one speaker on stage to the capacity crowd.

The people in the room, mostly women, realized what they were up against. It's a worldwide problem, Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse is helping victims in southern Arizona.

"It's close to my heart because we know what goes on unseen in the background. we're working now with the police as well, because they also go out and make calls locally to determine whether there is some abuse going on, how to treat that particular situation, and how to make sure that the person involved gets to a safe place," said Jane Fairchild, President of Sun City Oro Valley Women's Auxiliary.

Emerge! Center Against Domestic Abuse will be the beneficiary of Sunday's fundraiser by the Sun City Oro Valley Women's Auxiliary. There was a raffle, silent auction, and a fashion show as the lunchtime entertainment.

Organizers said that last year they donated more than $20,000 dollars to the shelter.

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