Fake kidnapping phone scam - Tucson News Now

Fake kidnapping phone scam

(Source: Tucson Police Department) (Source: Tucson Police Department)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

It starts with a simple phone call. One that police are warning could cost you thousands of dollars, if you don't pay attention to the signs.

According to the Tucson Police Department, they have received several calls in the last few days about this phone scam. It's called the fake kidnapping scam.

The scammer will call and have someone pretend to be a family member in distress. Police told Tucson News Now that usually it's a family member you haven't heard from in awhile.

MOBILE USERS: The KOLD News 13 mugshots of the month are available HERE.

While the fake family member is on the phone, the scammer gets on the line and demands money. One of the victims says, they asked for $5,000. Police say, this type of scam plays on the victim's emotion. It makes you feel that you have to do something to help out your loved one.

Phone scam red flags to listen for:

  1. The caller demands money right away.
  2. They ask you to wire the money or buy Pre-paid cards.
  3. Police also suggest that you don't volunteer any personal information to the caller.

Copyright 2017 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

MOBILE USERS: Download our app, the most-used news app in southern Arizona, to get breaking news alerts, weather forecasts and exclusive content on your Apple and Android devices.

  • Crime & CourtsMore>>

  • breaking

    Alleged purse snatcher turns self in to police

    Alleged purse snatcher turns self in to police

    Tuesday, June 27 2017 4:43 PM EDT2017-06-27 20:43:30 GMT
    The suspect turned herself in to Nogales police on Monday, June 26. (Source: Nogales Police Department)The suspect turned herself in to Nogales police on Monday, June 26. (Source: Nogales Police Department)

    Nogales police interviewed the 54-year-old Nogales resident and began the booking process. Charges were referred to prosecution for further processing.

    Nogales police interviewed the 54-year-old Nogales resident and began the booking process. Charges were referred to prosecution for further processing.

  • Arizona DPS sets up operation to catch a serial speeder

    Arizona DPS sets up operation to catch a serial speeder

    Wednesday, June 21 2017 11:23 AM EDT2017-06-21 15:23:51 GMT
    Tuesday, June 27 2017 11:15 AM EDT2017-06-27 15:15:11 GMT
    A serial speeder is in custody after the Arizona Department of Public Safety conducted a "special operation" to apprehend the motorcyclist. (Source: MCSO/3TV/CBS 5)A serial speeder is in custody after the Arizona Department of Public Safety conducted a "special operation" to apprehend the motorcyclist. (Source: MCSO/3TV/CBS 5)

    A suspected serial speeder is in custody after the Arizona Department of Public Safety conducted a special operation to apprehend the motorcyclist. 

    A suspected serial speeder is in custody after the Arizona Department of Public Safety conducted a special operation to apprehend the motorcyclist. 

  • Prosecutors use Joe Arpaio's immigration talk against him

    Prosecutors use Joe Arpaio's immigration talk against him

    Monday, June 26 2017 8:04 PM EDT2017-06-27 00:04:17 GMT
    Tuesday, June 27 2017 9:26 AM EDT2017-06-27 13:26:03 GMT
    Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, front right, leaves U.S. District Court on the first day of his contempt-of-court trial Monday, June 26, 2017, in Phoenix. (Source: AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, front right, leaves U.S. District Court on the first day of his contempt-of-court trial Monday, June 26, 2017, in Phoenix. (Source: AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

    Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's criminal trial opened Monday over his defiance of the courts in traffic patrols that targeted immigrants, marking the most aggressive effort to hold the former lawman of metro Phoenix accountable for tactics that critics say racially profiled Latinos.

    Former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's criminal trial opened Monday over his defiance of the courts in traffic patrols that targeted immigrants, marking the most aggressive effort to hold the former lawman of metro Phoenix accountable for tactics that critics say racially profiled Latinos.

Powered by Frankly