Mother shares boy's severe reaction to scorpion sting to raise a - Tucson News Now

Mother shares boy's severe reaction to scorpion sting to raise awareness

Jericho Lewis had a severe reaction to two scorpion stings. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Jericho Lewis had a severe reaction to two scorpion stings. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
His mother and grandmother might never have known what was the cause of the boy's discomfort had they not found a bark scorpion still crawling on him. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) His mother and grandmother might never have known what was the cause of the boy's discomfort had they not found a bark scorpion still crawling on him. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Bark scorpions are one of the most common species in Arizona, and the most venomous. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Bark scorpions are one of the most common species in Arizona, and the most venomous. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Three days later, Jericho is as happy and talkative as ever. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Three days later, Jericho is as happy and talkative as ever. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
BUCKEYE, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

It's heating up outside, and with that comes more creepy crawlies. Scorpion stings increase in the summer months.

We know to watch out for them, but do you know what it looks like when a young child is suffering from a scorpion sting? It happened to a Buckeye boy recently.  

At 10 months old, Jericho Lewis has a lot to say.

But his mother Kelsie Lewis was the one at a loss for words when he started showing strange symptoms last Saturday.

"Once the symptoms set in, it happened so fast," said Lewis.

[RELATED: Valley baby stung by scorpion prompts mother to take precautions]

The boy's grandmother documented his reaction on her cellphone.

To some, it might look like a child having a tantrum. But he was actually suffering from a severe reaction from a scorpion sting.

Lewis says he had all the signs, red face, trouble breathing, darting eyes and tongue, vomiting. Scorpion stings are painful and can be deadly for small children.

"It's like a whole-body spasm because it attacks their neurological system," said Lewis.

Jericho had been stung twice, on his wrist and thigh. The sting itself showed very little redness or swelling. They might never have known what was the cause of the boy's discomfort had they not found a bark scorpion still crawling on the boy.

Bark scorpions are one of the most common species in Arizona, and the most venomous.

Jericho's family called 911. He was driven to Phoenix Children's Hospital. It took two vials of antivenom to reverse the symptoms.

“There's really nothing you can do to console them at that point. It's just waiting," she said.  

Three days later, Jericho is as happy and talkative as ever.

[RELATED: Scorpions are out: Keep them out of your home]

His mother now wants all parents to see what happened to him so no one else's child has to go through the same.

"I know that you watch out for them. They're dangerous. If they're stung you might want to call poison control. But you don't know that it can have that effect on their little bodies," said Lewis. "I just want people to know what it looks like."

If you’ve been stung, you can put ice on the area to bring down the swelling and take an antihistamine to ease inflammation and itching. Then call the Arizona Poison Control center at 1-800-222-1222 to determine if you need to go to the hospital.

There are ways to avoid getting stung in the first place:

  • Wear shoes, especially at night.
  • Put on gloves when you work in the yard, lift rocks and logs or collect firewood.
  • When you camp, don't sleep on the bare ground.
  • Shake out your shoes before you put them on, especially if you've left them outside or in a basement or garage.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.


  • Local newsMore>>

  • Arizona Women's Golf wins national championship

    Arizona Women's Golf wins national championship

    Thursday, May 24 2018 1:57 AM EDT2018-05-24 05:57:55 GMT

    Arizona wins the third NCAA Women's Golf Championship in program history.

    Arizona wins the third NCAA Women's Golf Championship in program history.

  • Sunnyside graduates take different path to future goals

    Sunnyside graduates take different path to future goals

    Thursday, May 24 2018 1:08 AM EDT2018-05-24 05:08:35 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    There was a celebration on Tucson's south side Wednesday night as Sunnyside High's graduation ceremony sent 396 seniors off into the real world.

    There was a celebration on Tucson's south side Wednesday night as Sunnyside High's graduation ceremony sent 396 seniors off into the real world.

  • KOLD INVESTIGATES: Hospital in jeopardy

    KOLD INVESTIGATES: Hospital in jeopardy

    Wednesday, May 23 2018 11:41 PM EDT2018-05-24 03:41:10 GMT
    Chayse Vance was a young lady with an eye for art and a heart of gold, according to her family. She hung herself after a stay at the Sonora Behavioral Health Hospital, which has a shocking number of violations. (Source: Vance Family)Chayse Vance was a young lady with an eye for art and a heart of gold, according to her family. She hung herself after a stay at the Sonora Behavioral Health Hospital, which has a shocking number of violations. (Source: Vance Family)
    Chayse Vance was a young lady with an eye for art and a heart of gold, according to her family. She hung herself after a stay at the Sonora Behavioral Health Hospital, which has a shocking number of violations. (Source: Vance Family)Chayse Vance was a young lady with an eye for art and a heart of gold, according to her family. She hung herself after a stay at the Sonora Behavioral Health Hospital, which has a shocking number of violations. (Source: Vance Family)

    One Tucson hospital stands out in Arizona for its violations. Our investigative team logged and analyzed piles of data from the state department of health services to find out who's to blame and what's being done.

    One Tucson hospital stands out in Arizona for its violations. Our investigative team logged and analyzed piles of data from the state department of health services to find out who's to blame and what's being done.

Powered by Frankly