Dogs at risk on the Fourth of July - Tucson News Now

Dogs at risk on the Fourth of July

Dogs will jump fences, chew through doors, break screens and even jump from a second-floor window to escape the fear of loud sounds. (Source: KOLD News 13) Dogs will jump fences, chew through doors, break screens and even jump from a second-floor window to escape the fear of loud sounds. (Source: KOLD News 13)
  • Related LinksMore>>

  • Pet safety tips for the Fourth of July

    Pet safety tips for the Fourth of July

    Friday, June 30 2017 10:20 PM EDT2017-07-01 02:20:10 GMT
    (Source: Pima County)(Source: Pima County)

    Not every member of the family may enjoy the fireworks, pets included.  The Pima Animal Care Center is offering a few safety tips for pet owners during the Fourth of July.  

    Not every member of the family may enjoy the fireworks, pets included.  The Pima Animal Care Center is offering a few safety tips for pet owners during the Fourth of July.  

TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

When the 4th of July fireworks go off throughout the neighborhood, many dogs get agitated, scared, and even panicked.

So much so, that they will do crazy things to escape the noise, like jump through windows.

"I've had to fix dogs with glass cuts," Marana veterinarian Beth Neuman said. "A 100-pound dog will jump through a window easily."

Dogs will jump fences, chew through doors, break screens and in one case, even jump from a second-floor window (he survived) to escape the fear of loud banging sounds. 

So what to do, especially if you're leaving the pet at home while you go out to watch the fireworks. Some dogs like closets if there's a blanket and maybe a couple of toys. It's secure. Others will do fine in a room with no windows.

If that's not an option, leave the TV on or tune it to talk radio. The dog doesn't care which political persuasion. 

Soothing white noise might do the trick and there are many CD's for that. 

A chemical restraint, that is a doggie downer, might relax the dog enough to keep it sane. Ask the vet about that first though. 

There's such a thing as a "ThunderShirt" that will wrap around the dog to make it feel that it is being held, easing its fears.

"My experience is that it's 50-50," Neuman said. "It works on one of my dogs, but not the other."

And if it's an issue without a solution, there's always staying home and holding the pet to make it feel secure.

Whatever is chosen however, many dogs may still break out.

"The 4th of July is my least favorite holiday," Neuman said. "The 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th are historically the busiest shelter times of the year."

There is no way to tell how many dogs escape on the holiday but because of the big increase in dogs hit by cars, bitten by rattlesnakes, or just showing up in strangers' backyards, it's thought to be a significant number. 

And this year will be a bigger question mark than in past years.

Marana and Sahuarita have opted out of Pima Animal Care and will go it alone to provide their own animal services. Animals will be boarded at the Humane Society. 

In the past, the only agency to call about strays was Pima Animal Care. The only place to take a found pet was Pima Animal Care. It was pretty simple.

This year its more complex, with the Humane Society added to the mix.

If the animal is found in Marana, call 328-8020.

If the animal is found in Sahuarita, call 445-7877.

If the animal is found in Pima County, Tucson, Oro Valley, Vail, call 724-5900.

Anyone unsure of where the boundaries begin or end, here's a GPS map to help out.  

But there may be fees associated for residents in Marana and Sahuarita. The county has proposed $60 a night for boarding and $120 an hour for vet services. 

You can also click here, to look for lost pets. 

MOBILE USERS: Download the Tucson News Now app for Apple and Android devices.

Copyright 2017 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly