Bat workshop offers hands-on experience with AZGFD biologists - Tucson News Now

Bat workshop offers hands-on experience with AZGFD biologists

Bat (Source: Arizona Game and Fish Department) Bat (Source: Arizona Game and Fish Department)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Interested in learning more about bats? The Arizona Game and Fish Department is offering a special workshop to do just that.  

According to a recent news release from the AZGFD, there will be two more monitoring surveys on Friday - July 28, and Sept. 15 that will be held at the Needle Rock Recreation Area northeast of Scottsdale and will run from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. 

The cost for the workshops is $25 per person.  

Those interested in attending the events will be able to help capture and identify local bat species alongside AZGFD biologists, as part of the overall bat conservation and monitoring efforts.  After the data is recorded the bats will be released unharmed. 

AZGFD biologist and Watchable Wildlife Program Manager Randy Babb will provide a dynamic evening experience educating participants about Arizona’s 28 species of bats, while netting over the Verde River. He has worked on numerous studies and projects on small mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates in Arizona, New Mexico, the southeastern U.S., Mexico, Central America, Vietnam and southern Africa.

Space is limited for the events so register early.

Participants should wear long pants, close-toed shoes, a hat and insect repellent, and bring water and a headlamp or good flashlight.

To reach the events, head east on Rio Verde Drive to Needle Rock Road and head north 2.5 miles until you reach the fully developed recreation area.

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