How to talk to your kids about the Las Vegas mass shooting - Tucson News Now

How to talk to your kids about the Las Vegas mass shooting

(Source: Tucson News Now) (Source: Tucson News Now)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Video and horrific stories out of Las Vegas have been nonstop since the mass shooting that killed at least 59 people and injured more than 500.

That means it's likely your child heard the news, either on TV, social media or even from friends at school.

Experts say, depending on their age, it’s a conversation parents should have with their kids.

Dr. Brandy Baker is a clinical psychologist and co-founder of the Intuition Wellness Center in Tucson.

She said the first thing parents should do is find out their kids already knows and then follow their lead. Answer any questions they may have.

Dr. Baker says it’s important to validate their feelings. Let them know it’s OK to feel sad, confused and frustrated and help them cope with those feelings.

Las Vegas is a place associated with fun. Dr. Baker says that’s why parents should remind them that there are still safe in places like that.

“There's different types of violence now and there's a lot more coverage of it, and we have access to it instantaneously whether we like it or not. I think it's important to reassure our children that they are safe and those places that we knew as safe at one point don't automatically become unsafe because of a tragic event,” she said.

Dr. Baker said in tragic situations like this, it’s good to show your child who the heroes are.

“One of my favorite quotes ever was from Mr. Rodgers who said, 'look for the helpers.' So, in situations like this it’s really important to look how the community is rebuilding and coming together. Who are the heroes. Who are the first responders. Those are the important things to focus on,” she said.

Click here to read a blog post written by Dr. Baker about this topic.

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