Dusk Music Festival organizers work to make event safe, protect - Tucson News Now

Dusk Music Festival organizers work to make event safe, protect fans

(Source: Tucson News Now) (Source: Tucson News Now)
. -

Security has been increased at the Dusk Music Festival, which will through Saturday, Oct. 7 at Rillito Park in Tucson.

The promoters of the event, in its second year, said they considered canceling the event following the mass shooting in Las Vegas.

But after consulting with local law enforcement and security firms, the decision was made to go ahead.

"We felt like we had a responsibility," said Page Repp, a 25-year Tucson resident and UA grad. "If we cancel all public events and don't lead our lives, we give in to terrorism, we give in to hate."

The promoters added an additional layer of security to reassure the fans they are doing everything they can to insure their safety.

"We have inner security, outer security and another layer," Repp said. "We start a long way away to start securing the site"

Even though the extra security is expensive, the promoters feel it's something that is essential for the 10,000 to 12,000 fans who have bought tickets.

"We have to maintain the security of our guests, our artists and our staff," he said. "I mean there is nothing more important that we do."

MOBILE USERS: Download our Tucson News Now app for Apple and Android devices.

Copyright 2017 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

  • Local newsMore>>

  • APP EXTRA: Out of control overtime?

    APP EXTRA: Out of control overtime?

    Thursday, July 19 2018 8:22 AM EDT2018-07-19 12:22:32 GMT
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)
    (Source: Tucson News Now)(Source: Tucson News Now)

    The Tucson Police Department has fewer officers than it has had in the last 30 years. The problem is causing slow response times and is costing the city millions.

    The Tucson Police Department has fewer officers than it has had in the last 30 years. The problem is causing slow response times and is costing the city millions.

  • Arizona law would give frozen embryos to spouse who wants baby after divorce

    Arizona law would give frozen embryos to spouse who wants baby after divorce

    Thursday, July 19 2018 11:19 AM EDT2018-07-19 15:19:47 GMT

    Ruby Torres always thought about having kids. So when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014 she decided to undergo in vitro fertilization. "I wanted to one day become a mom," Torres said. "I wasn't sure what was going to happen in my future so I wanted to ensure I had that option and opportunity." Doctors used her eggs and her then-fiance's sperm to form seven embryos, but by the time she was medically cleared to try to get pregnant, they were divorcing. 

    Ruby Torres always thought about having kids. So when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2014 she decided to undergo in vitro fertilization. "I wanted to one day become a mom," Torres said. "I wasn't sure what was going to happen in my future so I wanted to ensure I had that option and opportunity." Doctors used her eggs and her then-fiance's sperm to form seven embryos, but by the time she was medically cleared to try to get pregnant, they were divorcing. 

  • TUSD aiming for efficient, user-friendly return to classroom

    TUSD aiming for efficient, user-friendly return to classroom

    Thursday, July 19 2018 9:57 AM EDT2018-07-19 13:57:32 GMT
    (Source: KOLD News 13)(Source: KOLD News 13)

    TUSD Superintendent Gabriel Trujillo says his hope is to make the first day of school across the district much more customer-service focused.

    TUSD Superintendent Gabriel Trujillo says his hope is to make the first day of school across the district much more customer-service focused.

Powered by Frankly