'Stop the Bleeding' class aims to empower people to help in emer - Tucson News Now

'Stop the Bleeding' class aims to empower people to help in emergency situations

(Source: Tucson News Now) (Source: Tucson News Now)
(Source: Tucson News Now) (Source: Tucson News Now)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

When a gunman opened fire on a Las Vegas crowd, bystanders rushed in to help save lives. On Thursday night, Oct. 19, a special training session was held at Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson to educate folks on how to help stop the bleeding in any emergency.

The “Stop the Bleeding Coalition” is a national initiative to empower people to take action during a shooting or car crash. Uncontrolled bleeding can result in death in as little as five to 10 minutes. Folks learned basic techniques to control bleeding by using their hands or a tourniquet until first responders can take over. 

One of the attendees, Suzy Burros, was coming out of the Walgreens, across the parking lot from Safeway on Jan. 8, 2011. That's when Jared Loughner shot U.S. Rep Gabby Giffords in the head. Six people were killed.

Burros told Tucson News Now she remembers that day vividly and wishes she had been better prepared to help.

“They weren’t even letting meds in yet because they were still locking down the parking lot and there were civilians helping – and I was too scared. I didn’t know what to do. We don’t expect to ever use it, but to have the knowledge – it’s pretty cool," Burros said. 

If you’re interested in attending the next “Stop the bleeding” class or to schedule a group class, email Susan Kinkade at Susan.Kinkade@BannerHealth.com.

For more information click here: https://stopthebleedingcoalition.org/   

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Copyright 2017 Tucson News Now. All rights reserved.

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