County issues air quality watch because of high winds - Tucson News Now

County issues air quality watch because of high winds

Pima County Department of Environmental Quality officials are urging people with breathing issues to be cautious near dust-prone areas as air quality is expected to worsen because of high winds on Thursday. (Source: KOLD News 13) Pima County Department of Environmental Quality officials are urging people with breathing issues to be cautious near dust-prone areas as air quality is expected to worsen because of high winds on Thursday. (Source: KOLD News 13)
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

The Pima Country Department of Environmental Quality has issued a health watch because of anticipated high winds.

Thursday, April 12, is a First Alert Action Day. Meteorologist Wes Callison is reporting a Wind Advisory from 11 a.m. until 9 p.m. because of winds up to 35 mph and gusts of up to 45 mph. 

The county is urging people with breathing issues to be cautious near dust-prone areas as it could be dangerous. Tiny particles picked up by the winds can cause irritation in your eyes, nose, throat and lungs.

Some short-term symptoms include coughing, sneezing, runny nose and shortness of breath. Children and the elderly are also at risk.

Doctors suggest at-risk individuals stay inside if possible. But if they must go outside, they suggest wearing a face mask.

The county keeps track of air quality conditions at 16 locations in eastern Pima County. Click here for the latest data: http://envista.pima.gov/

County officials say the wind-blown particles can remain in the air until Friday.

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