Boy, 8, brings knife to school, attacks 3 students - Tucson News Now

Boy, 8, brings knife to school, attacks 3 students

Officers took the second grader to the police station, where he was released to his parents. Social services will handle the case. (Source: WCCO/CNN) Officers took the second grader to the police station, where he was released to his parents. Social services will handle the case. (Source: WCCO/CNN)

SAUK RAPIDS, MN (WCCO/CNN) – Police say it’s unclear why a second grader in Minnesota brought a kitchen knife to school, but he injured three students, two of whom required stitches.

After the 911 call came in at 7:15 a.m. Monday, Sauk Rapids Police rushed to Pleasantview Elementary, where an 8-year-old had come to school with a kitchen knife.

The boy cut three children with the knife in less than a minute. Then he walked to the school office and put the knife down.

Police believe the attacks were random.

"I don't think he had an intended target when he came to school with the knife. We're not sure exactly why he came to school with a knife,” Chief Perry Beise said.

The injured students are in first, fourth and seventh grades. Police describe the injuries as minor, but two students required stitches because they were cut in the back of the head.

Police brought the 8-year-old attacker to the station, where they released him to his parents.

Children under the age of 10 cannot be criminally charged in Minnesota. Instead, their cases are handled by social services.

"Hopefully, he will receive some treatment,” Beise said.

Police say there is no indication the boy’s parents will face any charges.

The school district sent an email home to parents that read, “In situations like this the District’s discipline policy is applied and aggressive students are not allowed in the building(s).”

Copyright 2018 WCCO via CNN. All rights reserved.

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