Domino's on streets, not for pizzas but to fix potholes - Tucson News Now

Domino's on streets, not for pizzas but to fix potholes

MILFORD, Del. (AP) - The saying goes that the road to hell is paved with good intentions, but what if the road was paved with pizza?

News outlets report national delivery-based pizza chain Domino's is aiming to make commutes around the country a little less hellish, by helping to repair potholes.

The company's "Paving for Pizza" program has launched in four test cities: Athens, Georgia; Bartonville, Texas; Burbank, California and Milford, Delaware.

Milford's public works director, Mark Whitfield, says an abnormally harsh winter left the city with more potholes than usual. Milford received a $5,000 grant, which covered the repair of 40 potholes.

The city used their own crews, who stenciled Domino's logo and "Oh, yes we did" on the first few repairs.

Domino's is soliciting nominations for more cities.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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