Granite Mountain Hot Shots honored with new exhibit in Prescott - Tucson News Now

Granite Mountain Hot Shots honored with new exhibit in Prescott

The Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew Learning and Tribute Center opened in Prescott Friday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) The Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew Learning and Tribute Center opened in Prescott Friday. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
John Marsh's son, Eric Marsh, died in the Yarnell Hill fire. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) John Marsh's son, Eric Marsh, died in the Yarnell Hill fire. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
The Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew Learning and Tribute Center in Prescott. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News) The Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew Learning and Tribute Center in Prescott. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News)
More that 1000 artifacts and memorabilia are on display. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News More that 1000 artifacts and memorabilia are on display. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5 News
PRESCOTT VALLEY, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -

Saturday marks the five year anniversary of when 19 Granite Mountain Hot Shots were killed fighting a wildfire near Prescott.

[RELATED: Fifth anniversary of Yarnell Hill Fire that killed 19 firefighters is this weekend]

The Yarnell Hill Fire was the deadliest wildfire in Arizona history.

[ORIGINAL STORY: 19 firefighters dead in Yarnell wildfire]

The memory of the brave heroes is being kept alive through a brand new exhibit.

Friday was the official ribbon cutting and grand opening of the Granite Mountain Hot Shot Crew Learning and Tribute Center, located inside the Gateway mall in Prescott.

[RELATED: The Granite Mountain Hotshots]

 "It does bring back memories of the tragedy, but it's also gratifying that we can see the interest people have in the crew and the firefighting community together," said John Marsh, whose son Eric was one of the hot shots killed.

Inside the center, you'll see a wall of T-shirts that were sent in from fire crews across the country following the tragedy.

There are also an assortment of pictures and stories, and a separate display honoring every fallen firefighter.

"I think about the families," said visitor Kathy Carey. "They'll be missed forever you cant replace them."

Karen Norris' son Scott was also killed in the deadly wildfire.

Norris and Marsh are both board members that worked with city and the community leaders to put the Learning and Tribute Center together.

"It doesn't necessarily help with the grief, but it helps me know that they are memorialized, and there is this place for other people to come and remember our 19 hot shots," said Norris.

Norris also said the center is about more than just remembering the hot shots.

It's a place to learn about firefighting and to make sure a tragedy like this never happens again.

"No community wants to re-live what this community went through," said visitor David Sharrock.

There are more than 1,000 artifacts and pieces of memorabilia currently on display, with thousands more in storage.

Organizers are planning to rotate items every few months.

[RELATED: Yarnell ranch owners closest to where Granite Mountain Hotshots died recount tragic day]

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